Europe > Western Europe > France > The Best Places to See in Strasbourg

The Best Places to See in Strasbourg

By Brenda Nieto |

Escape to Strasbourg, France, and discover its unique charm following our tourist route.

TOURISM IN STRASBOURG

In the region of Alsace, in France, there’s a famous city that’s known thanks to its urban architectural landscape, and to the cultural richness found in its streets. DINKtravelers recommends walking the historic quarter of Strasbourg, an area which was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1988. There, you will find an interesting mix of French-German culture which sets this city apart from the rest of the destinations in France.

The historic quarter is located on an island surrounded by River III, so the way to reach it is by crossing the bridges whose construction dates back to the Middle Ages. There’s no crossing fee, and although in the past they used to be roofed, nowadays you will only see the columns that were part of the fortification that protected the town.

Start your day at the Vauban Dam, which was built around the 16th century and which now has a terrace that offers a panoramic view of the River III, the bridges that surround thehistoric quarter and the Petit France.

The Petit France is a renowned neighborhood where fishermen, tanners and millers used to live. This zone was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1988, and you will love it because it’s splashed with 16th and 17th-century houses which are characterized by their wooden black and white trusses, typical of the Rhenish style.

In order to learn more about the history of the old tanneries of Strasbourg, DINKtravelers recommends visiting the Maison des Tanneurs which is a 10 minute walk from the Vauban Dam.

MAISON DES TANNEURS IN STRASBOURG

The Maison des Tanneurs (House of Tanners) is located on the banks of the River III, in the area known as Petit France. It was built in 1572 and its location is due to the fact that, in the old days, the skin tanners dyed was soaked in this water branch in order to make it more flexible and give it shine. Subsequently, the Maison was transformed into a restaurant in 1949. Before trying some of the Alsatian delights they serve at this traditional venue, discover the ideal place to take a selfie: there is a caption that bears the building’s name and date of construction and that is located right next to the house.

WHAT TO EAT IN STRASBOURG?

Once you enter the Maison des Tanneurs, try the typical dishes and drinks of this destination. Our favorites:

  1. The Tarte Flambée It’s a dish that looks similar to a pizza as consists of a dough base topped with various ingredients that can range from sweets to salted including onion, sausage or strong cheeses like the Münster. Eat them with your bare hands and follow the tradition of not stopping eating until you’re full up!
  2. The Baeckeoffe It consists of three types of meat: beef, pork and lamb to which they add potatoes, garlic, onion and various herbs. The mix is put in an oven and cooked for three hours. It’s one of the most acclaimed dishes by both locals and tourists.

Pair your food with a glass of Riesling, a wine that’s produced with white grapes grown in the Rhine region in Germany and Alsace, France. It has given way to several denominations of origin and has an alcohol content of about 12 degrees. Search for labels that say: Vin d’Alsace Riesling, Alsace Gran Cru or Crémant d’Alsace.

CATHEDRAL OF NOTRE DAME IN STRASBOURG

After savoring the flavors of Strasbourg, surely you will want to visit its most iconic site: the Cathedral of Notre Dame. It’s located at a six-minue walk from The Maison des Tanneurs.Along the way, take a moment to see Gutenberg Square, where you will find the old Town Hall of Strasbourg; then, head to the cathedral through rue Mercière (Mercière Street).

The Cathedral of Notre Dame is dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and it’s the fourth most imposing church in height and Gothic ornamentation that was built in the fifth century.

Its façade portrays the Passion of Christ and it houses an astronomical clock, the first to mechanically calculate Easter days in the 19th century. If you want to see it work, go to the cathedral at half past noon, because at that time the clock’s mechanical features activate allowing human figures representing the 12 apostles to walk out and move around another figure representing Jesus.

To end your day, three minutes from the cathedral you’ll find the Batorama pier. This glass-roofed boat will take you across the River III allowing you to see the vast majority of the bridges surrounding the island and offering you a very different perspective of the buildings you’ve visited.

Don’t forget to leave early to visit all the places we have recommended. Organize your stops and schedule by consulting the city map online, wear sunscreen and enjoy everything you see and eat in Strasbourg. Safe trip!